Tata Steel Chess 2024 | Round 3 | Pragg, Gukesh, Vidit, Anish | Live commentary Sagar Amruta

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About the tournament: World Chess Champion Ding Liren returns for the 86th edition of the Tata Steel Masters, a 14-player single round-robin taking place from 13-28 January in Wijk aan Zee, the Netherlands. The time control is 100 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 50 minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment per move from move 1. We have three of our Candidates from India taking part – Vidit, Pragg and Gukesh. Also in the fray are Firouzja and Nepo who are also part of the Candidates. So a total of 5 out of 8. We also have other world class players like Giri, Maghsoodloo, Abdusattorov. An exciting event.

Tata Steel Masters Round 2 pairings:

🔸 Max Warmerdam vs Alireza Firouzja
🔸 Ju Wenjun vs Jorden Van Foreest
🔸 Vidit Santosh Gujrathi vs Ian Nepomniachtchi
🔸Alexander Donchenko vs Anish Giri
🔸 Gukesh D vs Ding Liren
🔸 Praggnanandhaa R vs Wei Yi
🔸 Parham Maghsoodloo vs Nodirbek Abdusattorov

🗞️Related Articles:
Preview article:
Round 1:
Round 2:

Official website:

Video: ChessBase India

#Chess #ChessBaseIndia #tatasteelchess2024 #tatasteelchess #praggnanandhaa #gukesh #viditgujrathi #anishgiri #dingliren #nepomniachtchi
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10 Comments

  1. Why is it that Indians always pronounce "psychology" in a strange manner? Instead of psyCHOlogy, they call it "psychoLOgy"

  2. 2400s beating 2600s is no longer a once-in-a-blue moon thing. Specifically, against Jaime, being able to manage time is at least half the battle saved if not won. Divya most likely out-prepared him, given his uncharacteristic (by his standards) move times in the opening and in the early middlegame. What was most impressive though, was the conversion. d6 and the queen moves were clinically executed, because they were seen well before her opponent did!

    While a transgression, the unpredictability of results vis-à-vis the rating difference of the players keeps growing by the day. Though it's not discussed (and is by no means logical) , I'm appalled by the number of mid-tournament withdrawals of players more so in Indian events, once they've realized the rest of tournament offers little chances of facing higher rated opponents. The ongoing Indore GM (which admittedly has more than 40% of the players below the rating threshold mentioned on the brochure) has nearly twenty players (including kids not even in their teens!) not paired in the last round. While organizers and players/parents can and should do their bit of 'soul search' when it comes to respectively admitting players and withdrawing midway, is it time for Fide to recalibrate the 'Rating Change Calculator' as well? I believe it was calibrated according to the probability of the three results for a given rating difference. Isn't it logical to assess the statistical outcomes every few years for the last assessment period and recalibrate the rating gain/loss if the statistical distribution of the results is starkly different than the 'expected probabilities' used to arrive at the numbers? Chess will of course be so much more refreshing when the unfortunate system of rating players or of computer-aided preparation impacting results cease to exist, till such time…

  3. 2400s beating 2600s is no longer a once-in-a-blue moon thing. Specifically, against Jaime, being able to manage time is at least half the battle saved if not won. Divya most likely out-prepared him, given his uncharacteristic (by his standards) move times in the opening and in the early middlegame. What was most impressive though, was the conversion. d6 and the queen moves were clinically executed, because they were seen well before her opponent did!

    While a transgression, the unpredictability of results vis-à-vis the rating difference of the players keeps growing by the day. Though it's not discussed (and is by no means logical) , I'm appalled by the number of mid-tournament withdrawals of players more so in Indian events, once they've realized the rest of tournament offers little chances of facing higher rated opponents. The ongoing Indore GM (which admittedly has more than 40% of the players below the rating threshold mentioned on the brochure) has nearly twenty players (including kids not even in their teens!) not paired in the last round. While organizers and players/parents can and should do their bit of 'soul search' when it comes to respectively admitting players and withdrawing midway, is it time for Fide to recalibrate the 'Rating Change Calculator' as well? I believe it was calibrated according to the probability of the three results for a given rating difference. Isn't it logical to assess the statistical outcomes every few years for the last assessment period and recalibrate the rating gain/loss if the statistical distribution of the results is starkly different than the 'expected probabilities' used to arrive at the numbers? Chess will of course be so much more refreshing when the unfortunate system of rating players or of computer-aided preparation impacting results cease to exist, till such time…

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